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The story behind the Lest We Forget Polo

The story behind the Lest We Forget Polo
17 October 2017 Sophia Sorensen
17 OCTOBER 2017

Remembering those who served our country is very important to the team at Lifewear Australia. A lot of time, research, consultation, and determination went into the designs of our Tribute Collection and it’s something that we hold great pride for. It is essential to tell a story through every piece in a way that is tasteful and has a clear meaning.

This is the story behind the ‘Lest We Forget’ Tribute polo.

 

Lest We Forget

these words have such meaning and history behind them. This powerful expression of remembrance is embedded in history and lives on to commemorate the fallen from the war. The phrase itself has a message of being careful not to forget which is derived from the Bible. It was first noted in 1897 in a poem called ‘Recessional’ written by Rudyard Kipling, and it was intended for Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee. The ‘Recessional’ is sung on the 25th of April every year to remember those who served Australia and New Zealand.

The Red Poppy flower – is the symbol of remembrance – is usually seen a lot when remembering war times and the fallen soldiers. The Red Poppy has special significance for Australians and is worn on Remembrance Day as well as on Anzac Day each year. It is featured largely on the back of the polo as well as on the right sleeve.

The Last Post

On the front of the polo is a soldier (bugler) playing The Last Post which is the bugle call indicating the end of the activities for the day. It can be heard at military funerals and memorial services to imply that the soldier has gone to his final resting place.

The Badge

The 3rd pattern Rising Sun badge can also be noticed on the front pocket and on the left sleeve: Lifewear Australia has a special endorsement for the usage of  this symbol approved by the Brand Manager of the Directorate of Communication, Army Headquarters, Australia.

The badge is a proud symbol which was worn by soldiers in both World War I and II. The background colour of the shirt is set to signify dawn to represent the landing on Gallipoli on the 25th of April 1915 in the early hours of the morning. The decision to land in the early hours of the morning while it was still dark was made with the purpose of being better hidden.

 

 

The back of the shirt shows a soldier riding a horse holding the Australian and New Zealand flags as men walk underneath. Walers were the type of horse used by light horsemen during the First World War for faster transport and to help soldiers get through trenches and other types of terrain. They were also good for protection as the horses would usually be hit first in the line of fire hence thousands died during war times. There is also a flock of birds shown above in the sky to symbolise freedom and the end of the war.

It’s important to take the time to remember the sacrifices that were made during wars and honour everyone who contributed and helped.

THE TRIBUTE COLLECTION

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